Music

Cannabis with Music to Feel So Good

Jelly and Peanut Butter and Canada and maple syrup are two things in the world that fit well together. However, nothing beats weed and music when it comes to the yin and yangs of the world. Let’s face it, who doesn’t enjoy listening to music while stoned? If you haven’t been living in a cave, you’re aware that smoking marijuana improves the music experience. It’s something the Snoop is well aware of, so is Bob; in a nutshell, it’s a no-brainer. Records such as Dark Side of Moon appear to have been produced to be the soundtrack to marijuana-induced intergalactic space and time travels. The only burning question is why?

What Music and Weed Have in Common

The perfect kind of songs, much like the right kind of Marijuana, can be highly relaxing. Music can reduce cortisol levels, a stress hormone, and aid in the relief of insomnia, depression, and anxiety. Weed has many of the same effects, but strains with too much THC can trigger different effects like paranoia and anxiety.  However, for people who become somewhat more nervous while using weed, music can also help to alleviate these symptoms, allowing for a much more pleasant high. Together, CBD Edibles and music will make you forget about the pressures of the day, allowing you to relax and live in the moment completely.

Lead Singer

Hearing a track you like, on the other hand, can produce a hyperactive feeling of goosebumps or a rush in the body. This results from dopamine, the same hormone that causes the body to respond to sex, food, and addictive substance with pleasure. Cannabis also affects dopamine release, but the highly complex relationship between weed and dopamine has caused some researchers to be perplexed. Anybody who’s ever listened to their favorite artist when high on weed will attest to the possible feel-good influence of this mix!

Music and Cannabis, interestingly, tend to have a more significant joint effect on the hippocampus of the brain than on its pleasure centers. This is because the hippocampus, the brain part in charge of short-term recall processing, is only inhibited when you are high on weed to keep your mind at the moment. Rather than your mind trying to guess what will happen next depending on what you just heard, this allows you to appreciate and feel the music every moment.

It’s worth remembering that not all music feels the same when high, just as it’s crucial to choose a strain that suits your specific preferences and desires. In case there’s music that leaves you feeling excessively depressed or that you utterly despise, you are unlikely to appreciate it more when stoned. Similarly, if a particular strain of Marijuana makes you paranoid or puts you to sleep, you’re unlikely to benefit from the increased concentration. If you’re a cannabis newbie, it might take a while to figure out what Marijuana and music work best for you.

How The Brain Processes Music When High

Some marijuana strains can significantly improve your ability to concentrate. Yes, this can also mean focusing on a single object or falling into a rabbit hole of deep thinking. However, when listening to music, Marijuana’s ability to block out distracting noise allows you to focus entirely on the song. Cannabis can also help to alleviate pain, depression, and panic, allowing the body and mind to chill and enjoy the music. The brain has to deal with a lot of information when it comes to music. Vibrations, patterns, time, and mathematics are all integrated into music that evokes emotion. Cannabis alters our perception of time, making it seem to slow down. When the mind slows down due to pot, hidden sound layers and variations in music timing get interpreted differently.

Brain Processes Music

While you’re high on pot, the visual and auditory sensations appear to mix. Many individuals claim they can see a song’s vibrations as colors, shapes, or other visual effects. Synaesthesia is a condition in which many senses in the mind blend together. Graphics like the colored light effects that typically accompany shows will blend with the auditory experience to offer a similar experience even though you can’t see the music itself.

Why Music Sounds Better When High

Besides the cumulative impact of weed and music on the brains, a couple of cognitive factors make music sound so good once you’re high on Marijuana.

Social Connections

Social Connections

For several millenniums, weed and music were known to improve human interaction. Even without using Marijuana, the feelings of interaction and bonding that come with experiencing a central emotional focus with lots of other people in a concert or even a few in your house can be euphoric. Weed, on the other hand, can heighten that feeling to a new level.

Positive Expectation

If you intend to enjoy listening to songs while smoking pot, high chances are you will do so.  Suppose you got an incredible experience when stoned listening to a specific artist, music, or genre at a particular event, your brain, often drawn to the familiar, would expect the same result next time. Hearing the song without being high, you’re more likely to form a positive connection. However, the greater the cognitive association is, the more variables are similar to the first experience. This could justify why, when high, individuals often continue to listen to the same types of music or musicians, or why other people tend to be drawn toward live concerts or, instead, sharing a joint around the sitting room turntable. Positive memory connections encourage us to strive to recreate those sensations again and again.

Summary

Music possesses the power to profoundly soothe us or give us joy that makes us want to jump out of our skin. So not only do our favorite songs sound better when high on weed, but we can also experience a tremendous deep connection when enjoying the moment with others. Plus, we cannot think of any disadvantages to this mix as long as you’re using your weed responsibly, so go for it!

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